12 Reminders For Indigenous Youth That You Matter And You Are Loved


The “We Matter” campaign is sharing messages of hope and survival.

This is Kelvin and Tunchai Redvers, Dené siblings from the Northwest Territories who want Indigenous youth to know that they matter.

This is Kelvin and Tunchai Redvers, Dené siblings from the Northwest Territories who want Indigenous youth to know that they matter.

The pair have launched the We Matter, a series of short videos in the style of the It Gets Better campaign.

“We want to convey to Indigenous youth that no matter how hopeless and lonely things feel or seem, there’s always a way forward,” Tunchai told BuzzFeed Canada.

Growing up in a small northern community, Kelvin and Tunchai have seen that pain first hand.

“We’ve lost cousins too early,” said Kelvin. “In my mom’s home community, it’s the kind of thing where people can count on their fingers remembering the suicides from the last five to eight years.”

Suicide is the leading cause of death for Indigenous youth and six young people in Saskatchewan died by suicide in October alone.

There are now more than 20 videos of Indigenous people — including youth and elders from all walks of life — sharing messages of hopes.

This is what they want young people to know. Click the names beneath the images to hear their full stories.

We Matter Campaign

Remember that even if you’ve come close to giving up, you didn’t.

Remember that even if you've come close to giving up, you didn't.

— Sydone Okheena, 17, Ulukhaktok, Northwest Territories

We Matter Campaign

Elders are rooting for you.

Elders are rooting for you.

— Violet Beaulieu, residential school survivor, Deninu K'ue First Nation

We Matter Campaign

The members of A Tribe Called Red want you to know how important Indigenous youth are to them.

The members of A Tribe Called Red want you to know how important Indigenous youth are to them.

— Ian Campeau, aka Deejay NDN, Nipissing First Nation

We Matter Campaign

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