Experts Say The Presidential Candidates Will Probably Live A Long Time Because They’re Rich And Well Educated News


2. The
current life expectancy for men and women aged 70 in the US
is 84.4 and 86.6 respectively, according to the most
recent data from CDC.

And that’s more than enough to get you through two terms in
office.

“From a general perspective, it’s very important to
understand that having made it past 65 gives you an expected
life expectancy that’s longer than what’s published as your
life expectancy from birth,” said Dr. Anne Newman, chair of
epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School
of Public Health and director of Pitt’s Center for Aging and
Population Health.

“It’s reasonable to expect if you make it to your late
sixties that you’ll make it to your late eighties.”

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3. And if
you’re worried about the next president’s longevity, their
income and level of education may tell you everything you
need to know.

And if you're worried about the next president's longevity, their income and level of education may tell you everything you need to know.

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Education and income level are more predictive of longevity
than any one medical risk factor, Eileen Crimmins, PhD,
professor of gerontology at University of Southern
California, told BuzzFeed Health. (Racial discrepancies also
exist in terms of life expectancy, though that gap tends to
close with age.)

According to a recent study in the
Journal of American Medical Association
, higher
income was associated with increased longevity. The
difference in life expectancy between the richest 1% and the
poorest 1% was 14.6 years for men and 10.1 years for women.

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4. For
someone aged 70 with a college education, the likelihood of
surviving to age 75 is 91% for men and 94% for women,
according to Crimmins.

For someone aged 70 with a college education, the likelihood of surviving to age 75 is 91% for men and 94% for women, according to Crimmins.

View this image ›

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

The more education you have, the higher your life expectancy,
Laura Carstensen, PhD, founding director of the Stanford
Center on Longevity, told BuzzFeed Health.

Having a higher level of education is also thought to be a
protective risk factor when it comes to dementia, said
Newman.

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6. So as
rumors circulate around why the candidates aren’t releasing
full medical records, experts say that there’s not likely
anything in them that would be of consequence.

So as rumors circulate around why the candidates aren't releasing full medical records, experts say that there's not likely anything in them that would be of consequence.

View this image ›

Jsmith / Getty Images

Unless it reveals a diagnosed medical condition that has so
far been kept under wraps — like diabetes, dementia, or
cancer — it’s unlikely we’ll get any major red flags, said
Crimmins.

According to Newman, information that would be medically
relevant would include a history of smoking, a history of
heart attack and/or stroke, kidney functioning, and how often
they get cancer screenings. Other risk factors that could be
worth noting are cholesterol levels and blood pressure; if
those are fine, then other subjects of speculation — like
weight — may not be a factor.

Outside of all that, good genes and a family history of
longevity would be your best bet for predicting health and
life expectancy.

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