How Much Do You Actually Know About Antidepressants?


1.


Correct!

Wrong!

It’s true.


Experts believe that depression is caused by an
imbalance of certain chemicals in the brain, like serotonin
and norepinephrine, and that this affects nerve
connections. Antidepressants work by making these chemicals
more available throughout the brain.


It's true.

Via
Bannosuke / Getty Images

2.


That the drug is only meant to be used for mental
illnesses.

That the drug has not been approved by the FDA.

That the drug carries serious or life-threatening
risks.

That children and teens shouldn’t use the drug.


Black box warnings are the strictest of prescription drug
warnings. Antidepressants get them because they may
increase suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children,
teens, and young adults under 25 years old, especially
within the first few weeks of starting or when a dose is
changed.


A black box warning tells people when a drug has serious or life-threatening risks.
Tap to play GIF

Via
NBC / giphy.com

3.


Correct!

Wrong!

SSRI stands for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.


SSRIs work in the brain by increasing levels of serotonin,
a neurotransmitter involved in
regulating emotion, anxiety, and stress, among other
things. They do this by preventing (inhibiting) the
absorption (reuptake) of serotonin into nerve cells, which
allows the chemical to accumulate.


SSRI stands for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

Via
Nickelodeon / giphy.com

4.


They’ve been proven to decrease symptoms of
depression and improve mood in fewer doses than other
antidepressants.

They are relatively safe and have been proven to
cause fewer side effects than other antidepressants.

They are the newest version of antidepressants on the
market.

They work in 100% of patients.

Correct!

Wrong!

SSRIs are the most commonly prescribed antidepressant
because they are relatively safe and have been proven
to cause fewer side effects than other kinds of
antidepressants.


These side
effects include drowsiness, nausea, insomnia,
nervousness, dizziness, headache, and blurred vision.


SSRIs are the most commonly prescribed antidepressant because they are relatively safe and have been proven to cause fewer side effects than other kinds of antidepressants.
Tap to play GIF

Via
Showtime / tenor.com

5.


Correct!

Wrong!

NOOIs aren’t a class of antidepressant drug.


MAOIs stands
for monoamine oxidase inhibitors, SNRIs stands for
selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and as you
know from above, SSRIs stands for selective serotonin
reuptake inhibitors. Each class affects neurochemistry in
different ways. And as for NOOIs? There’s no such thing.


NOOIs aren't a class of antidepressant drug.

Via
Savushkin / Getty Images

6.


They help the enzyme monoamine oxidase produce
norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain.

They prevent the enzyme monoamine oxidase from
removing the neurotransmitters norepinephrine,
serotonin and dopamine from the brain.

They help the enzyme monoamine oxidase remove
norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine from the
brain.

They prevent the enzyme monoamine oxidase from
producing norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine in
the brain.

Correct!

Wrong!

They prevent the enzyme monoamine oxidase from removing
the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin and
dopamine from the brain.


The first type of antidepressant ever
developed, MAOIs prevent (inhibit) monoamine oxidase
from removing those neurotransmitters from the brain. In
doing so, it increases the levels of these
neurotransmitters so that they can effect changes in the
cells and cell circuits that have been impacted by
depression.


They prevent the enzyme monoamine oxidase from removing the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine from the brain.

Via
ktsimage / Getty Images

7.


Correct!

Wrong!

Marzipan is not the name of an antidepressant!


It’s actually the
name of a confection made with almond paste, sugar, and
egg whites.


Marzipan is not the name of an antidepressant!

Via
hlphoto / Getty Images

8.



It’s actually the other way around. Tricyclics are called
first-generation antidepressants because they were among
the first developed — being introduced in the 1950s. SSRIs
came later; the first one was introduced in the 1980s. That SSRI, called zimeldine, was
later withdrawn from the market after it was linked to
several cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome.


False!
Tap to play GIF

Via
Orion Pictures / tenor.com

9.


Correct!

Wrong!

Antidepressants are more effective at treating chronic,
severe depression than they are at treating mild
depression.


According to the National
Institutes of Health, the more severe the depression
is, the better antidepressants will work. That means that
antidepressants will work better for chronic, moderate, or
severe depression than it will for mild depression.


Antidepressants are more effective at treating chronic, severe depression than they are at treating mild depression.
Tap to play GIF

Via
Paramount Pictures / giphy.com

10.


Correct!

Wrong!

It usually takes about 1–2 years of antidepressant use
to prevent relapse — although it might sometimes take
longer.


People who might benefit from taking antidepressants for
this amount of time include those who’ve already had several
relapses, those who absolutely want to avoid a relapse, and
those who have chronic depression.


It usually takes about 1–2 years of antidepressant use to prevent relapse — although it might sometimes take longer.
Tap to play GIF

Via
FOX / giphy.com

11.


Correct!

Wrong!

Anxiousness is not an uncommon side effect of taking
antidepressants.


Over half of all people who use antidepressants report experiencing side effects, which
usually occur during the first few weeks of treatment.
These side effects typically include dry mouth, headaches,
anxiousness, feeling faint, and a decreased sex drive. Only
a very small number of people have reported heart problems,
epileptic fits, and liver damage.


Anxiousness is not an uncommon side effect of taking antidepressants.
Tap to play GIF

Via
FOX / giphy.com

12.


Correct!

Wrong!

Tricyclics are more likely than SSRIs to cause all of
these side effects.


On the other hand, SSRIs are more
likely than tricyclics to cause diarrhea, headaches,
sleep problems, and nausea. Different types of
antidepressants will cause different side effects, so it’s
worth talking to your doctor about what the pros and cons
are — that way you’ll find the best fit for you.


Tricyclics are more likely than SSRIs to cause all of these side effects.
Tap to play GIF

Via
Cartoon Network / giphy.com

13.


They both increase levels of serotonin and
norepinephrine in the brain.

They are both first-generation antidepressants.

Neither should be used to treat major depressive
disorder.

They both have the same molecular structure.

Correct!

Wrong!

Both increase levels of serotonin and norepinephrine in
the brain!


They do this by preventing molecules of norepinephrine and serotonin
from being absorbed back into the nerves. This causes
them to accumulate in the brain, increasing their levels
and ultimately improving mood. SNRIs, however, are a
newer class of antidepressants, which cause fewer side
effects.


Both increase levels of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain!

Via
cosmin4000 / Getty Images

14.


Generalized anxiety disorder

Correct!

Wrong!

It’s all of the above.


Research has shown SSRIs may help treat all
of these conditions — although, fun fact: It’s actually the
side effects of SSRIs that helps people with premature
ejaculation.


It's all of the above.
Tap to play GIF

Via
Comedy Central / madeupmonkeyshit.tumblr.com

15.


Correct!

Wrong!

Serotonin syndrome is most often associated with MAOIs.


Serotonin syndrome occurs when serotonin
levels get too high in the brain, and it can lead to
symptoms like shivering, diarrhea, fever, seizures,
agitation, hallucinations, and stiff or rigid muscles.
While it’s usually linked to MAOI use, it can also happen
with newer classes of antidepressants if used alongside
certain other medications.


Serotonin syndrome is most often associated with MAOIs.
Tap to play GIF

Via
NBC / giphy.com

16.


Electric shock sensations

Correct!

Wrong!

Dry mouth isn’t a symptom of antidepressant withdrawal.


Everything else is, though, and they
typically happen within a day or two of stopping.
Antidepressants aren’t addictive, but they can cause
withdrawal symptoms if they’re discontinued too fast —
especially if they’ve been used for more than six weeks.
For this reason, people who are on antidepressants should
always talk to their doctor if they want to discontinue
use, since their doctor might recommend gradually
reducing the dose.


Dry mouth isn't a symptom of antidepressant withdrawal.
Tap to play GIF

Via
FOX / giphy.com

How Much Do You Actually Know About Antidepressants?
Oh no! Looks like you don’t know too much about
antidepressants.

Hey, there ARE a lot of them, and each has slightly different
effects on the body, so it can get pretty complicated. That
said, there’s always room for improvement — especially if
you’re thinking of going on these drugs — so we hope you
learned something from this quiz!

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Your antidepressant knowledge is just…OK.

It’s not bad, but you could definitely benefit from knowing a
thing or two more, especially if taking these drugs is
something you’re considering. Hopefully this quiz helped you
move in that direction!

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You really know a lot about antidepressants.

Maybe it’s because you’re someone who’s used them, or maybe you
work/know people who have depression. Either way, it’s great
that you know so much about them, and we hope you can spread
that knowledge to others who are in need.

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